atasehir escort pendik escort ankara escort

Announcement

Collapse

Vudu Forum Guidelines

Vudu Forum Guidelines

The Vudu Forums are designed to help viewers get the most out of their Vudu experience. Here, Vudu customers may post information, questions, ideas, etc. on the subject of Vudu and Vudu -related issues (home theater, entertainment, etc). Although the primary purpose of these forums is to help Vudu customers with questions and/or problems with their Vudu service, there are also off-topic areas available within the Vudu Forums for users to chat with like-minded people, subject to the limitations below.

Please post all comments in English. When posting a comment in the Vudu Forums, please conduct yourself in a respectful and civil manner. While we respect that you may feel strongly about an issue, please leave room for discussion.

Vudu reserves the right to refrain from posting and/or to remove user comments, including comments that contain any of the following:

1. Obscenities, defamatory language, discriminatory language, or other language not suitable for a public forum
2. Email addresses, phone numbers, links to websites, physical addresses or other forms of contact information
3. "Spam" content, references to other products, advertisements, or other offers
4. Spiteful or inflammatory comments about other users or their comments
5. Comments that may potentially violate the DMCA or any other applicable laws
6. Comments that discuss ways to manipulate Vudu products/services, including, but not limited to, reverse engineering, video extraction, and file conversion.

Additionally, please keep in mind that although Vudu retains the right to monitor, edit, and/or remove posts within Vudu Forums, it does not necessarily review every comment. Accordingly, specific questions about Vudu products and services should be directed to Vudu customer service representatives.

Terms of Use - User Comments, Feedback, Reviews, Submissions

For all reviews, comments, feedback, postcards, suggestions, ideas, and other submissions disclosed, submitted or offered to Vudu, on or through this Site, by e-mail or telephone, or otherwise disclosed, submitted or offered in connection you use of this Site (collectively, the "Comments") you grant Vudu a royalty-free, irrevocable, transferable right and license to use the Comments however Vudu desires, including, without limitation, to copy, modify, delete in its entirety, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from and/or sell and /or distribute such Comments and/or incorporate such Comments into any form, medium or technology throughout the world.
Vudu will be entitled to use, reproduce, disclose, modify, adapt, create derivative works from, publish, display and distribute any Comments you submit for any purpose whatsoever, without restriction and without compensating you in any way. Vudu is and shall be under no obligation (1) to maintain any Comments in confidence; (2) to pay to users any compensation for any Comments; or (3) to respond to any user Comments. You agree that any Comments submitted by you to the Site will not violate the terms in this Terms of Use or any right of any third party, including without limitation, copyright, trademark, privacy or other personal or proprietary right(s), and will not cause injury to any person or entity. You further agree that no Comments submitted by you to this Site will be or contain libelous or otherwise unlawful, threatening, abusive or obscene material, or contain software viruses, political campaigning, commercial solicitation, chain letters, mass mailings or any form of "spam."

You grant Vudu the right to use the name that you submit in connection with any Comments. You agree not to use a false email address, impersonate any person or entity, otherwise mislead as to the origin of any Comments you submit. You are, and shall remain, solely responsible for the content of any Comments you make and you agree to indemnify Vudu for all claims resulting from any Comments you submit. Vudu takes no responsibility and assumes no liability for any Comments submitted by you or any third-party.
See more
See less

The Problem with Season Pass:

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    The Problem with Season Pass:

    It is cool to get a current season of a marquee series like BBCs Orphan Black and be able to see episodes shortly after they are aired instead of having to wait for the EST/Packaged Media release date.

    Generally, I sink my money into TV series that I would of been willing to purchase the packaged media for. Since my family's tastes are unique to us, I have purchased several season passes of children and nature series that are not marquee. Much more niche.

    With a TV series that has already aired, you know exactly how many episodes you will be purchasing. Not so with a season pass purchase.

    A case in point, Lego: The Legends of Chima. I bought season #2 in HDX for $41.72.

    Season #1 had 20 episodes and cost the same. Season #2 seams to only have six. There is a current Wikipedia indicating the series will pick back up with Season #3 later this summer.

    I have found that TV networks hold their cards close to their chests with respect to air dates and number of episodes. This is due to the highly competitive advertising market they live in.

    As a result, buying a season pass leaves the owner having to wait and see what they end up actually having purchased until the TV network decides to let them know.

    It is frustrating for me as a consumer and I feel there should be some expectation set when a season pass is purchased. If nothing else, the number of episodes should be known ahead of time.

    #2
    Re: The Problem with Season Pass:

    That stings. I think this needs to be re-priced. You can buy all six episodes in HD for 18.00 or in SD for 12. Walter should get a refund and be able to buy them again at the new price.

    Comment


      #3
      Re: The Problem with Season Pass:

      What is nice about Amazon Prime is that you are billed per episode as they become available. So if a show is cancelled mid-season or for some reason they don't air as many episodes as you expect it doesn't matter...you are paying a per episode price each week. I hope that Vudu will someday have this.

      Comment


        #4
        Re: The Problem with Season Pass:

        Originally posted by LuzRinggold View Post
        What is nice about Amazon Prime is that you are billed per episode as they become available. So if a show is cancelled mid-season or for some reason they don't air as many episodes as you expect it doesn't matter...you are paying a per episode price each week. I hope that Vudu will someday have this.
        I do not like that feature. I like to make my purchases and be done. I hate how Amazon will charge your CC out of the clear blue sky. That really crinkles my britches.

        Originally posted by echopulse View Post
        That stings. I think this needs to be re-priced. You can buy all six episodes in HD for 18.00 or in SD for 12. Walter should get a refund and be able to buy them again at the new price.
        IMDB is showing 20 episodes in season #2. For season #1, they aired three in the spring and then no more until July. That may be the case with this season too with the remaining 14 episodes Wikipedia is calling Season #3 will be apart of my season #2 Vudu purchase.

        I guess the point I am making is not so much about the specific example, but the concept of buying a season pass and not knowing what you just purchased until the TV networks decide to let you know. It seems to be to be something that consumer advocacy mentality should come up with a solution for.

        For instance, making public the number of episodes you will have as a result of your season pass purchase. That to me seems like a reasonable request.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: The Problem with Season Pass:

          Originally posted by Walter-S_North_Carolina View Post
          I do not like that feature. I like to make my purchases and be done. I hate how Amazon will charge your CC out of the clear blue sky. That really crinkles my britches.
          When you purchase the season pass you agree to it, so it's not out of the clear blue sky. You make your purchase and you are done. After that Amazon will handle charging your card as the new episodes are made available and send you an email. And I think you can cancel it at any time. Anyway, I love this feature but I know that everyone is different.

          Perhaps a better approach would be that we pay for say 20 episodes up front and if only 10 are actually made then we get credit for the difference at the end of the season.

          Comment


            #6
            Re: The Problem with Season Pass:

            Originally posted by LuzRinggold View Post
            Perhaps a better approach would be that we pay for say 20 episodes up front and if only 10 are actually made then we get credit for the difference at the end of the season.
            That is a great idea!!!

            Season Pass cost is determined by the number of expected episodes and if the TV network falls short, a credit is issued.

            I do think the TV networks do not publish the number of episodes, air dates, and such to keep the knowledge from their competition. Also, if a series is getting low rating, they do not want to commit to keeping it in a slot when it can be replaced with something else that is getting higher ratings. This leaves the concept of a season pass product a bit difficult to work with, both on the consumer end and the service provider end.

            Comment


              #7
              Re: The Problem with Season Pass:

              Originally posted by Walter-S_North_Carolina View Post
              That is a great idea!!!

              Season Pass cost is determined by the number of expected episodes and if the TV network falls short, a credit is issued.

              I do think the TV networks do not publish the number of episodes, air dates, and such to keep the knowledge from their competition. Also, if a series is getting low rating, they do not want to commit to keeping it in a slot when it can be replaced with something else that is getting higher ratings. This leaves the concept of a season pass product a bit difficult to work with, both on the consumer end and the service provider end.
              Part of the problem is that the number of episodes is not necessarily known at the start. Sometimes a series will start with a short season order (say 10-13 episodes) and then, based on how successful it is, may get a full season pickup sometime after it's already started airing.

              Or, at the other end of the spectrum, it could get cancelled before filming of the final episode(s) has completed.

              On the one hand, I like how Amazon charges for the episodes as they become available. If you buy a lot of Season Passes each year, this method can definitely help spread out the cost so that you aren't spending a huge amount up front.

              However, on the other hand, the way Vudu does it can result in better deals. With a Season Pass at Amazon, you only get a 5% discount. I've bought numerous Season Passes on Vudu that ended up being a lot more heavily discounted than that. But, as you say, there's then the risk that you can end up being grossly overcharged if the season gets cut short of expectations, for whatever reason.

              Comment


                #8
                Re: The Problem with Season Pass:

                I think, so far, we all agree that there is room for improvement with the season pass products.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: The Problem with Season Pass:

                  Originally posted by Walter-S_North_Carolina View Post
                  It is cool to get a current season of a marquee series like BBCs Orphan Black and be able to see episodes shortly after they are aired instead of having to wait for the EST/Packaged Media release date.

                  Generally, I sink my money into TV series that I would of been willing to purchase the packaged media for. Since my family's tastes are unique to us, I have purchased several season passes of children and nature series that are not marquee. Much more niche.

                  With a TV series that has already aired, you know exactly how many episodes you will be purchasing. Not so with a season pass purchase.

                  A case in point, Lego: The Legends of Chima. I bought season #2 in HDX for $41.72.

                  Season #1 had 20 episodes and cost the same. Season #2 seams to only have six. There is a current Wikipedia indicating the series will pick back up with Season #3 later this summer.

                  I have found that TV networks hold their cards close to their chests with respect to air dates and number of episodes. This is due to the highly competitive advertising market they live in.

                  As a result, buying a season pass leaves the owner having to wait and see what they end up actually having purchased until the TV network decides to let them know.

                  It is frustrating for me as a consumer and I feel there should be some expectation set when a season pass is purchased. If nothing else, the number of episodes should be known ahead of time.

                  We're gonna take a look at the Lego season. I'll be in contact with your shortly.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: The Problem with Season Pass:

                    Oh, that would be great.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X