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Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

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    Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

    I'm new to Vudu and Ultraviolet, but I am an experienced multimedia consumer.

    So, I am baffeled here...can someone please explain if I am understanding this correctly.....I am under the impression that Disc to Digital is a Cloud Service that requires me to pay at least $2.00 per title to upload a movie that I already own, just so that I may have the ability watch my own movie wherever I am?

    The whole idea seems so counter-productive and completely counter intuitive. Why would I pay to watch a movie that I already own and then go through all of these time wasting gyrations to stream or download it again?

    I don't get it. I'm reasonably intelligent and I encourage new technology, but Disc to Digital seems kind of silly to me.

    Someone, please enlighten me.

    Thanks,

    SkySaw

    #2
    Re: Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

    Originally posted by SkySaw View Post

    The whole idea seems so counter-productive and completely counter intuitive. Why would I pay to watch a movie that I already own and then go through all of these time wasting gyrations to stream or download it again?

    I don't get it. I'm reasonably intelligent and I encourage new technology, but Disc to Digital seems kind of silly to me.

    Someone, please enlighten me.

    Thanks,

    SkySaw
    First, I will assume that you do want digital access to your content. This means you go through the process of ripping and converting your physical media to a digital, portable, format (for me this is a .mp4 container suitable for use on a Playstation 3, Xbox 360, Win PC, and iPad) for use on your devices. The legality of this practice is questionable, but not likely to incur legal action. There should be no reason I can't make a digital back-up of my physical disc, but breaking the copyright protection may be against Copyright laws.


    Disc to Digital is a method to legally acquire a digital license to your physical media. It is more than the ability to stream or download, it is a persistent license which you retain, should you lose or damage your beloved physical media. I have used it primarily to upgrade DVDs from 480p DVD quality to 1080p HDX, of which some were damaged beyond playability.

    I want all my media available in the same location, which means UV and Vudu are only a marginal solution until the new .uvu format files become available. Then, I'll be able to stock my home media server with all my movies, those with UV digital license, and the few without. The key will be cross-platform compatibility, the .uvu files should play on all approved UV players, whereas files I create must use specific codecs and profiles to achieve the same result (not all .mp4 files are equal).

    Perhaps the other main factor is the 'Laziness Quotient,' that is, I can thumb around with my remote and play a reasonably high-quality copy of a film without leaving my couch, bed, computer chair, etc to put in a physical disc. I also save lots of shelf space by putting those physical copies in a closet or attic, as I don't need them readily available.

    Hope this gives you a few reasons, if not, maybe someone else will add some better info.

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

      For me its just easier to have all my movies on my tv screen to find something to watch, I use Vudu thru my roku. Also great when I'm travelling as I don't have to try to remember and decide what I might wan't to watch, they all come with me wherever I go. The ultimate in convenience.
      Now if there is that one great movie I love and wan't the best possible picture I go grab the bluray. Otherwise I stream it, or sometimes download it first.

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

        Originally posted by huskerbear View Post
        For me its just easier to have all my movies on my tv screen to find something to watch, I use Vudu thru my roku. Also great when I'm travelling as I don't have to try to remember and decide what I might wan't to watch, they all come with me wherever I go. The ultimate in convenience.
        Now if there is that one great movie I love and wan't the best possible picture I go grab the bluray. Otherwise I stream it, or sometimes download it first.
        Unfortunately you cannot stream your collection (through Vudu) out of the country. So it's actually where ever you go with in the U.S. for those that may travel abroad.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

          Originally posted by MoWeb View Post
          Unfortunately you cannot stream your collection (through Vudu) out of the country. So it's actually where ever you go with in the U.S. for those that may travel abroad.
          Hopefully the Common File Format (CFF), .uvu filetype will fix this. Of course, you'd still need to download your movies either through a UV service or Torrents (should be able to do it in U.S. Or abroad), and you might need your latest license update on your player prior to leaving the country (still hazy on how license confirmation will work).

          Additionally, there are ways to work around those restrictions (however, some may violate ToS). I plan to eventually serve all my content to myself (I already do this with my non-UV/Vudu content, in fact, I was watching a movie stored 400 miles away this very morning). I know CFF will not be a cure-all, but it is closer to my Digital content Utopia and should grant more freedom of use and consolidation of content (Here's hoping XBMC will handle the CFF licensing).

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

            Disc to Digital is for you if:
            -you want a central repository for streaming your movies, but you don't want to take the time and effort to rip all your movies and set up your own server.

            -you have multiple devices you want to watch your movies on including smart phones, ipods, ipads, android tablets, computers, smart TV's etc.

            -you have family members in your home or outside of your home you want to share your movie collection with.

            Originally posted by SkySaw View Post
            that Disc to Digital is a Cloud Service that requires me to pay at least $2.00 per title to upload a movie that I already
            If you do 10 Bluray to HDX or DVD to SD at one time with the program its $1 per title (while discount lasts until end of December).

            Originally posted by SkySaw View Post
            The whole idea seems so counter-productive and completely counter intuitive.
            It's actually very productive if you plan to make use of the service, not so much if you don't. You have to be a movie lover, or just like collecting things to get the most out of the service.
            I would also say its relatively intuitive as well; have disc, have disc to digital program, use program, can now watch movie on iPad.

            If you just want to watch your Blurays on your TV at home or you never rewatch movies, then you don't need the service.

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

              Vudu & UV are convenience. I barely touch a Blu-Ray disc these days. D2D didn't sway me into the streaming scene either. I already chose Vudu by choice before D2D was implemented. D2D is just an added bonus for me.

              PS- You don't really own the movie, you just own the licence to view the movie from the disc. If the consumers would really own the movie then the studios would be selling them 50 million a pop.

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

                Originally posted by MoWeb View Post
                Unfortunately you cannot stream your collection (through Vudu) out of the country. So it's actually where ever you go with in the U.S. for those that may travel abroad.
                Always a way...

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

                  Originally posted by SkySaw View Post
                  I am under the impression that Disc to Digital is a Cloud Service that requires me to pay at least $2.00 per title to upload a movie that I already own, just so that I may have the ability watch my own movie wherever I am?

                  The whole idea seems so counter-productive and completely counter intuitive. Why would I pay to watch a movie that I already own and then go through all of these time wasting gyrations to stream or download it again?
                  I wanted to be sure you understood the process of converted a movie (disc) to digital. This process does not require you to "upload" the movie. You would either take you movie to a store that does disc-to-digital and they would verify you have the movie, log into your account and add the movies to your account. The only stores doing this is Walmart for Vudu. To my knowledge Best Buy, Verizon, and Target do not offer an in store disc-to-digital program and I am not sure if they have any plans to either.

                  The other method of doing disc-to-digital is to use any of the at home programs such as Vudu TOGO, CinemaNow, and Flixster. You will find that Vudu offer far more titles than everyone else, which is one reason why most of us use Vudu. You will find that the success rate is probably about 65%. When a movie that you know is available for Disc-to-Digital doesn't work then you will have to take it to Walmart (or wait for who knows how long for the movie to actually be available through whichever program you are trying to use).

                  The fee that you pay is sort of like an extra license that you are buying that gives you the right to view a digital copy of your movie in the cloud. Once a movie is in your UV locker it is said that it will remain there forever, even if your physical copy becomes damaged or if it's ever lost. So having a backup is another benefit that I am not sure if anyone mentioned or not. This is really great if you have children!

                  The only two downsides to all this from my point of view is that UV doesn't have 100% participation by the studios and there are MANY movies critical to the success of UV still missing and I don't feel that we have an interface that works well for those of us who have hundreds of movies in our library. So you might not like having half of your collection in the cloud and the other half on your shelf. You also might find it faster to find a movie on your shelf than in your UV locker. But it's still a fairly young technology and I am hoping that somewhere down the line these issues will work themselves out.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

                    Originally posted by MoWeb View Post
                    Unfortunately you cannot stream your collection (through Vudu) out of the country. So it's actually where ever you go with in the U.S. for those that may travel abroad.
                    right, but that is why there is a down load & watch feature.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

                      Originally posted by SkySaw View Post
                      I'm new to Vudu and Ultraviolet, but I am an experienced multimedia consumer.

                      So, I am baffeled here...can someone please explain if I am understanding this correctly.....I am under the impression that Disc to Digital is a Cloud Service that requires me to pay at least $2.00 per title to upload a movie that I already own, just so that I may have the ability watch my own movie wherever I am?

                      The whole idea seems so counter-productive and completely counter intuitive. Why would I pay to watch a movie that I already own and then go through all of these time wasting gyrations to stream or download it again?

                      I don't get it. I'm reasonably intelligent and I encourage new technology, but Disc to Digital seems kind of silly to me.

                      Someone, please enlighten me.

                      Thanks,

                      SkySaw

                      SkySaw,

                      I can empathize, as I once thought as you do now.

                      I work in technology. I have been wanting to have remote access to my entertainment collection for about a decade.

                      First, there were juke boxes. The high end ones would hold fifty. They were expensive.

                      Then, slowly, there was the ability to stream from Windows Media Player as a home media server and other applications began to stand up into this space. iTunes and Plex being two very popular ones. The process was to rip a title via a dvd decrypter and then use handbreak to transcode into a digital file format.

                      This took an enormous amount of time and CPU cycles on the computers of the early 2000s. I did a few titles and was able to stream onto my new PS3 which I was using as a set top box for my TV playback. There was a dramatic loss of quality.

                      As the enthusiasm for ripping DVDs and transcoding them into a common file format began to perforate around the internet, the computing power also was increasing and this blatantly illegal practice became quite common.

                      The process of running a home LAN for media file playback onto a computer or TV became simplified and sites like iso-Hunt and Pirate Bay became highly popular.

                      The down side to these practices was many fold (besides it being an illegal practice):
                      1. a tremendous amount of HDD space is needed
                      2. a large investment in time is necessary
                      3. A/V sync, codec mismatch, file breaks are all common quality problems
                      4. computer virus infection is common


                      For me, a technology professional of over two decades, it would be child's play, and yet I do not.

                      Instead, for $2 per title I have a professional do it for me and all the problems listed above go away. No time investment. No storage needed. No client/server LAN setup needed to be administered in my home.

                      This is why I did D2D on my entire physical collection. Plus, this is the only time in history where studios allowed for an upgrade in quality.

                      I can upgrade my DVD for 1080p playback in this medium. I can not mail it to a studio and have them mail me a BluRay Disc for a $5 upgrade fee, nor could I mail in my VHS for a DVD. All my D2D transactions sourced from DVD titles were upgrade purchases for this reason.

                      My family now has what I consider to be an impressive collection available at our fingertips with fully baked mobility features we can enjoy on our cell phones, iPads, Kindle Fires, and iPod Touch.

                      Plus, my decade long goal of having access to my personal entertainment collection from a TV remote is realized. Add to this the future proofing and reliability inherent in redundant storage array technology. The national archives rates optical disc storage at five years. After that, data loss is expected due to reflective derogation. No such loss of data occurs on redundant storage arrays. On them, quality remains pristine for perpetuity.

                      In my mind, the D2D program is a very good value.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

                        Originally posted by Walter-S_North_Carolina View Post
                        right, but that is why there is a down load & watch feature.
                        I don't have space on my tablet for that. I would prefer to stream, so yes, this is an issue for some of us.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

                          Originally posted by MoWeb View Post
                          I don't have space on my tablet for that. I would prefer to stream, so yes, this is an issue for some of us.
                          Yeah, I work at an ISP and the DSL modem on my desk is fed from a router in Canada (long story).

                          Anyway, anytime I am in work there is no Vudu streaming. I guess that is a good thing. At least for me to get work done, but bad for folks who are out of country a lot.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

                            Sorry if I sound like a bit of an idiot by saying this or if it's found to be irrelevant but what happens to the DVD after I convert it to a digital copy? Does it wipe the data or does it have no impact or bearing on the DVD/BluRay?

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: Please explain the process of disc to digital and its benefits.

                              Originally posted by AdamBOD View Post
                              Sorry if I sound like a bit of an idiot by saying this or if it's found to be irrelevant but what happens to the DVD after I convert it to a digital copy? Does it wipe the data or does it have no impact or bearing on the DVD/BluRay?
                              Nothing happens to the DVD. Its still yours to own with the movie intact.
                              Dan H.
                              VUDU QA

                              Comment

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